Monthly Archives: November 2013

SR Jesus and The Doctor, Christ the King 2013

Link: Jesus and The Doctor, Christ the King 2013

Summary of what I was saying and why:
I start with the line from Jeremiah, “the days are surely coming.” And with that ran toward eschatology. I took a bit from Moltmann, a bit of sacrificial Eucharistic atonement, and Doctor Who. I wound up considering just how much the Reign of Christ is not what we expect, at any and all times.

Theology: eschatology
Jesus Count: medium
Good News: it all breaks down

What did I change on my feet?
I cut a whole section that morning and adapted it back in. It was the right choice but worked better at he second service.

What didn’t work/what did I miss?
I’m not sure I communicated the change in the perspective of time well. I’m not clear to do that or if I needed to.

What did work?
I liked the Doctor Who reference. A lot.

Other sermons I liked:

Priest Lightcap considers our relationship to kings and has me pondering the significance of the border.

Priest Arnold reminds us to kneel. (And I really don’t do this justice. Please go read it.)

Priest Linman has a Star Trek reference and a reference from a hymn. Sold.

(Here’s the list of people I usually listen to. Am I missing someone?)
The Anglican Church of Canada uses the Roman Ordinary Time numbering system instead of numbering the Propers. Because all of this is new to me, I’m now indicating both numbering systems.

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

I Choose to Stay

A recent post by Tony Jones on Theoblogy called for a schism over the question of women’s ordination.** This has kicked off some response.

I, as a woman ordained in a liberal branch of Christ’s Church, don’t agree.
You might think that I’d appreciate the solidarity for women’s ordination. After all I get quizzical looks and questions about being a nun when I’m in my collar.

I love my Church. I delight in my priesthood.
And I too choose to stay.

I stay after my weight, my marital status, my age, my health are all topics I’ve been asked about in job interviews,* and by mentors. I stay after hearing the leader of my parish label my desire to be acknowledged as a member of the parish as an inappropriate need to feel important. I stay after mentors, cornerstones of the Church made inappropriate jokes about my apparel. I stay after conversation after conversation where I have to repeat that “I’m the priest.” I stay after numerous people assume that my honesty, lauded as vulnerability in older men, is weakness. I stay after my questions are dismissed because they relate to women, pregnancy, and work. I stay after conversations where largely male colleagues left me to make the point that sexism and inequality still exist. I stay knowing I have colleagues who believe my person, my theology, and my resulting actions are an affront to the Gospel we both believe in. I stay even though my therapists ask me why I stay.
I choose to stay.

Not because I believe that unity should be stronger than our differences. Not because I know that every group of people will not perfectly agree on any issue. Not because Church isn’t suppose to be easy. Not because they let me. Not because they ordained me. Not because I fear leaving.

I’ve thought about leaving.
I have sat in the pews of Churches that make different, arguably less horrible, mistakes than mine. I learned that those Churches were not my Church.
So I stay in this Church I love, this Church which isn’t always sure it wants me, this Church which has hurt me so deeply, this Church which is frequently unsure what to do with me, this Church which still gets so much wrong.
I choose to stay.

Why?
Church should be about where people encounter Jesus.
This is where I best see Jesus.
I choose to stay.

*Questions on these subjects are illegal.

**Mr Jones has elaborated on what he was saying.  It is worth reading.  I am not trying to argue or dispute either of his posts.  I believe that some honesty about the imperfect nature of the Church and the ongoing decision we all make, in some way, to stay is worth holding up alongside reasons people leave.

Categories: Church, My Life | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment

Jesus and The Doctor, Christ the King sermon 2013

The lessons can be found by clicking here.  I worked with all three readings.

Time collapses, history all happens at once.  It’s either Dr Who or Jesus.

Listen here:

Categories: Sermon | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

SR Things that Last 17Nov2013

Link: Things that Last, 17 November 2013

Summary of what I was saying and why:
Everything is temporal. One of my mentors told me that. It all decays, deteriorates, gets torn down.
Even the things that matter to us. That matter to the people we leave them too.
Except water, wine, bread. Jesus’s followers have been sharing those for 2,000 years.

Theology: Stewardship, Sacraments
Jesus Count: medium
Good News: Water, wine, bread, the sacraments last.

What did I change on my feet?
The conclusion. As usual.
What didn’t work/what did I miss?
I missed a whole section at the early service. I’m not sure I made the connection between the work we do and the Gospel we proclaim. One of my favorite lines (If we build it we have to maintain it.) didn’t work as well in the sermon.
I think I could have made the distinction between the outward and visible things we emphasize and the ones Jesus emphasizes better.

What did work?
I’d forgotten this story. It was good to be able to tell it.

Other sermons I liked:

Priest Lightcap gets even more direct saying, “Life — or at least the life we know now — it will always be temporary, provisional, and confusing.

Priest Roberston remembers that ”God is not done with mystery, even if we are.”

Bishop Fisher runs headlong into Jesus’s statement about persecution.

(Here’s the list of people I usually listen to. Am I missing someone?)
The Anglican Church of Canada uses the Roman Ordinary Time numbering system instead of numbering the Propers. Because all of this is new to me, I’m now indicating both numbering systems.

Categories: Sermon Review | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Things that Last, a sermon for 17 Nov 2013

The lessons can be found by clicking here.  I worked with Luke 21:5-19.

Jesus announces the end of everything.  All of the lasting things we build.

Listen:

Categories: Sermon | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

SR P27/OT32 not preaching on Haggai

Summary of my planned sermon
*explanation* I have chronic migraines. Horrible, daily medication chronic migraines. Once, maybe twice a year, a migraine rises to the standing-is-a-BAD-idea lever. That it happened on a Sunday was insult to injury. Thank you to the people of St Peter’s who rose to the occasion.)

I was going to preach on Haggai’s question: “Who saw this house in it’s former Glory?”
Everyone and no one. Because it’d been a few decades. And memory is not that reliable. And what does it mean to rebuild what never was. How maybe that costly, impossible goal is our appropriate response to God.

We will now proceed directly to

Other sermons I liked:

Priest Affer challenges the limits of our imagination.

Priest Andrews-Weckerly has me recalling my questions.

Priest Arnold answers with “God’s Daughter”. (And has me back in Narnia. He doesn’t go there, and I support that. But I hear it in my mind.)a

(Here’s the list of people I usually listen to. Am I missing someone?)
The Anglican Church of Canada uses the Roman Ordinary Time numbering system instead of numbering the Propers. Because all of this is odd to me, I’m now indicating both numbering systems.

Categories: Sermon Review | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

SR Budgeting Grace, All Saints 2013

Link: Budgeting Grace, All Saints 2013

Summary of what I was saying and why:
All Saints was also the first Sunday of our pledge month. And I didn’t want it to be a “saints=money, give us money.”
Our response, faithful and wise, to our inheritance is about stewardship.

Theology: hagiology and stewardship
Jesus Count: low
Good News: grace is not budgeted

What did I change on my feet?
Not a lot.
What didn’t work/what did I miss?
I missed some of the budget paragraph in the early service. I didn’t get to anything about how we are to respond by squeezing all of the grace we can out of our lives.
I also missed the recorder. Batteries matter.
What did work?
I liked including the treasure of grace medieval theology.
I also think it was important to contrast God’s abundance with the importance for our budgets.

Other sermons I liked:

Priest Shaver considers our shared death.

Priest Arnold also goes a little Reformation.

Bishop Fisher reminds us that God is backward thinking.

(Here’s the list of people I usually listen to. Am I missing someone?)
The Anglican Church of Canada uses the Roman Ordinary Time numbering system instead of numbering the Propers. Because all of this is new to me, I’m now indicating both numbering systems.

Categories: Sermon Review | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Budgeting Grace, All Saints sermon 2013

The lessons can be found by clicking here.  I leaned toward Ephesians 1:11-23, but mostly preached hagiology (Sainthood).

I was taught that budgets were important–and that grace doesn’t have a budget.

Listen:

Categories: Sermon | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: