Uncategorized

Spotted Knapweed and Kingdom Gardens, July 2017

spotted knapweedMorsels & Stories: I did some show and tell with the main traveling communion sets I use.

 

Sermon: How does pulling spotted knapweed as a child interact with Jesus’ parable of the weeds?

 

 

The lessons can be found by clicking here. I worked most closely with Matthew 13:24-30 36-43.

 

Listen: 

Categories: Sermon, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Seeds, Scattered July 2017

seeds scatteredMorsels & Stories:  We spent a little more time with the Children’s Illustrated Bible from last week.

 

 

Sermon:  What might this parable have sounded like if it was told today?  What does the product of the seed in good ground need to hear?

 

The lessons can be found by clicking here.  I worked most closely with Matthew 13: 1-9 18-23.

Listen: 

Categories: Sermon, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

I wonder…Abraham and Isaac, July 2017

I wonder....

Morsels & Stories: Offertory plates.  I talked about ours and what they do.

 

Sermon: I guided us through the Abraham and Isaac story with some pauses to wonder.  (This sermon involves some pauses.)

 

The lessons can be found by clicking here. I worked most closely with Gen 22:1-14.

Listen: 

Categories: Sermon, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Keep My Commandments, Easter 7 2017

end famine elca

Morsels & Stories: I talked about #praytoendfamine.  You can learn more here.

Sermon: Jesus tells us to love him and keep his commandments.  What does Jesus tell us about how we best keep commandments?

 

The lessons can be found by clicking here.  I worked most closely with John 14:15-21.

Listen:

Categories: Easter, Sermon, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

The Commandments, The Love, The Way Easter 5 2017

the commandmentsMorsels & Stories: I talked about the part of the Eucharistic Prayer called the anamnesis.  How time gets slippery, bringing the past forward so it is present with us during the Eucharist.  I read from “The Cult as Recapitulation of the History of Salvation,” Jean Jacques von Allman’s essay in Primary Sources of Liturgical Theology.

Sermon: Jesus is the way, the truth, and the life, and it is a way that leads back through the ancient texts and commandments.

The lessons can be found by clicking here.  I worked most closely with John 14:1-14.

Listen:

Categories: Easter, Sermon, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The sheep outside, Easter 4 2017

The Good Shepherd cares about the sheep left outsideMorsels & Stories: I read from the introduction to Rabbi Kushner’s reflection on psalm 23, The Lord is my Shepherd.

 

Sermon:  I remember a story we read about a month ago about Samuel heading off to anoint the boy out in the field with the sheep.

 

The lessons can be found by clicking here.  I worked most closely with John 10:1-10.  The story about Samuel is from 1 Samuel 16:1-13.

Listen:

Categories: Easter, Sermon, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Quest Long and Prosper

One of the more fun things I had to do while seeking ordination (often called The Process because it is long—8 years in my case—and arduous and can veer straight into institutionalized hazing), was a summer parish internship.  I was offered a position at a little church, where I stayed in their apartment and could walk down to the farmers market Sundays after services.  As I’ve been ordained longer and preached more, I’ve been increasingly thankful for that church.  They very kindly listened to some sermons I would preach very differently now.

But along with their homiletical patience, an inside peek at day to day Church life and power differentials, they also taught me something very important about who sits in our pews: Geeks.

I’d preached a sermon that mentioned my deep love of speculative fiction (SF—often called science fiction and fantasy).  It wasn’t horrible.  And while I don’t remember the details of the sermon, I do remember that for the rest of the morning people would approach me, always when it would be just the two of us, and confess their love for Star Trek.  We are all, I learned that morning, Star Trek geeks. 

This memory surfaces when I’m afraid I’m about to get too geeky for people.  It’s a balm against a the cultural norm that asks us geeks to stay in the basement with our dice, books, and to-scale models.  It helps me remember that, even when the rest of the world seems a little too normal, I have a place in the pews with all the other geeks.

My friend, Jordan Haynie Ware, wrote a fabulous book about the Church and Geeks.  Jordan and I go way back on Twitter and were once in the same room at General Convention 2012.  She is awesome.  She is a geek.  Ultimate Quest: A Geek’s Guide to (The Episcopal) Church (CA link) establishes her as a wise and witty writer.

Far more effectively than the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, Ware draws readers through the basics of Christian faith, with an special eye on Episcopal pomp and circumstance.  She manages both an eye for the essential things people first wandering into the Church would need or want to know with enough detail to impress some longtime attendees at coffee hour.  And please join in me in giggling, hopefully internally, next time a congregation near you starts some “communal slam poetry.”

As the title promises, Ware introduces lay and clergy in gaming terms,

“Laypeople are the front-line fighters of the Christian party.  Clergy are the caster—they hang back “buffing” with encouragement and teaching, “detecting magic” by naming the Holy in everyday life, and “healing,” by offering the sacramental presence of God when that everyday life gets rough.” (pg 47)

managing a delightful balance of truth, humour, with a deft combination of Church and gaming geek-doms. 

Through out the book Ware shows her thorough knowledge of many corners of SF and Church worlds, citing the Bible, Joss Whedon’s works, The Prayer Book, The Princess Bride, Hamilton, papal encyclicals, Marion Zimmer Bradley, CS Lewis, and, yes, Star Trek among many others.  And if you don’t know all of these inside out there’s a bibliography (“Worlds Unknown”) in the back—you can find some new favourite authors and artists. 

Definitely written with a particular care for those who are new or newly exploring faith and the Church, this book would fit nicely into the shelves of all faithful geeks as we seek to “Quest long and prosper.”

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Salty, February 2017

saltMorsels & Stories: I talked about why and how we clean up after communion.

 

Sermon: Why salt isn’t like other spices.

 

 

The lessons for today can be found by clicking here.  I worked most closely with Matthew 5:13-20.

 

Listen:

Categories: Epiphany, Sermon, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

I have seen the Lord! Easter 2016

Triduum Triptych by Jo Nygard Owens used with permission

Triduum Triptych by Jo Nygard Owens
used with permission

Morsels & Stories: Why colour Easter eggs?  I tell the story of Mary Magdalene’s red eggs.

 

Sermon: Mary runs to tell the apostles, “I have seen the Lord!”  Just as Mary, Hannah, and Miriam also proclaimed God’s miracles.

 

The lessons for today be found by clicking here.  I worked most closely with John 20:1-18.

 

 

Listen:

Categories: Easter, Holy Week, Sermon, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Washing Feet, remembered

A brief snippet from a longer piece I’m working on:

In seminary our liturgy professor told my class that the Triduum, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, Easter Vigil, preach themselves.  And I knew that it was true. 

I remember the liturgy, but not what my priest said about it, not how it was presented, not how the logistics happened (even now I have to look things up and walk through it in my head).  My memory simply holds the story of this days, more than the details.

It must’ve been middle school when I first attended this liturgies.  I remember watching the women in the choir slip off shoes and knee high pantyhose.  For my middle school, engineer raised self, this was insight into the mystery of womanhood and sudden equality with people I looked up to.  Somehow, tonight, we became more alike than not.
I remember strangers, for all that we’d worshipped together for half a decade or more, handling my o-so-sensitive feet kindly and gently—unlike my brothers who still delighted in tickling me breathless. 

And I still walk away from the simplicity of chairs, basins, towels, and water wondering how they add up to so very much.

“I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another.”

Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: